“Park access should not be considered a luxury. It is a right,” says Mary Creasman, California Director of Public Affairs for The Trust for Public Land. The bill—known as the California Drought, Water, Parks, Climate, Coastal Protection, and Outdoor Access for All Act of 2018—recognizes the importance parks play in a community’s quality of life as well as the lack of access to them in urban and disadvantaged communities. The bill provides definitions of “disadvantaged” and “severely disadvantaged” communities and provides them with guaranteed funding. SB-5 also includes funding to improve climate change and sea level rise resiliency in at-risk areas. “With existing funding sources disappearing, SB-5 comes at a critical moment to demonstrate California’s renewed commitment to conservation and parks for all,” says Jay Ziegler, Director of External Affairs and Policy for The Nature Conservancy. The bill will be subject to voter approval in 2018, adding another important vote to an already pivotal ballot year. MA

The California Legislature has made state history by passing SB-5, which acknowledges the importance of parks and climate-change resiliency for some of California’s most disadvantaged communities.

“Park access should not be considered a luxury. It is a right,” says Mary Creasman, California Director of Public Affairs for The Trust for Public Land. The bill—known as the California Drought, Water, Parks, Climate, Coastal Protection, and Outdoor Access for All Act of 2018—recognizes the importance parks play in a community’s quality of life as well as the lack of access to them in urban and disadvantaged communities. The bill provides definitions of “disadvantaged” and “severely disadvantaged” communities and provides them with guaranteed funding. SB-5 also includes funding to improve climate change and sea level rise resiliency in at-risk areas. “With existing funding sources disappearing, SB-5 comes at a critical moment to demonstrate California’s renewed commitment to conservation and parks for all,” says Jay Ziegler, Director of External Affairs and Policy for The Nature Conservancy. The bill will be subject to voter approval in 2018, adding another important vote to an already pivotal ballot year. MA

About the author

Michael Hunter Adamson was born and partly raised in the Bay Area and spent his childhood balancing adventure with mischief. As an equally irresponsible adult he has worked for The Nature Conservancy, the arts and education nonprofit NaNoWriMo, taught English in Madrid-based High School equivalent, and volunteers with The Marine Mammal Center. As a writer for Estuary and AcclimateWest, Michael employs his love for nature and his interest in people to help tell the unfolding story of the living Earth.